An Ethiopian Feast!

I have been wanting to make an African dinner and the motivation came when we received collards and potatoes with our crop share.  I made a 3 part meal to be served on a platter with injera, traditional Ethiopian bread.  Luckily we have an Ethiopian restaurant in town, Ras Kassa’s, where we were able to buy the bread.  The bread is spongy in texture and serves as an eating utensil.

I found all of these recipes online and did a small amount of adjusting to fit my needs.  All the ingredients besides the bread are common and easy to locate.

~

Ki Ser Ena Denech (Beets and Potatoes)

  • 4 Beets, small-medium
  • 4 Red Potatoes, medium-large
  • Red Onion, sliced super thin
  • Lemon Juice, 1/4 cup fresh
  • Olive Oil, 4-5 tbsp
  • Salt & Pepper, to taste

Boil both the beets and potatoes separately until soft.  While boiling slice the onion and add it to the olive oil and lemon juice.  Set aside to marinade.  Once the beets and potatoes are boiled and cooled, peel and chop.  Mix all ingredients, season with salt and pepper, and refrigerate until serving.

P1010003

Beets and Potatoes

~

Gomen (Collard Greens)

  • Collards
  • Olive Oil, 1/4 cup
  • Red Onion, chopped
  • 2 Garlic Cloves, chopped
  • Ginger, 1″ grated
  • Broth, 1 cup
  • Salt, 1/2 tsp
  • Pepper, 1/4 tsp
  • Cardamom, 1/2 tsp

Remove the stem from the collards and boil for ~15 minutes.  Drain thoroughly and chop thinly.  Heat the oil up and fry the garlic and ginger for ~5 minutes.  Add the greens, broth, salt, pepper, and cardamom.  Simmer until the liquid has cooked out ~15 minutes.  I let this sit on the counter once completed and served it room temperature.

P1010004

Raw Collards

P1010008

Cooked Collards

~

Green Plantain

Slice the plantain in half, skin on, and boil for ~20 minutes.  Once boiled and cooled, peel and slice.  Sprinkled the slices with salt and let sit to be added to the main dish upon completion.

P1010009

Green Plantain

P1010023

Boiled Plantain

~

Kik Alecha (Yellow Split Peas)

  • 2 Onions, finely minced
  • 3 Tomatoes, finely chopped
  • 3 tbsp Garlic, finely minced
  • 3 tbsp Ginger, grated
  • Olive Oil, 1/2 cup
  • Water, 6-8 cups hot
  • 1 lb Split Peas
  • Turmeric, 2 tsp
  • Basil, dried 2 tsp
  • Pepper, 1 tsp
  • Cardamom, 1 tsp
  • Salt, 2 tsp

Wash and Drain Peas.  Cook onions dry on medium heat for 5 minutes.  Add water to prevent from browning if necessary.  Next add the tomatoes and garlic cooking for another 5 minutes, not to brown or burn.  Then add ginger and cook another 5 minutes again adding water as needed to prevent browning.

Add oil and cook stirring frequently for another 5 minutes.  Add peas and continue to stir frequently.  Add hot water as needed; the sauce should be thick not watery so add water little by little as it cooks into the peas.  It took about an hour for the peas to cook down completely and I used at least 6 cups of hot water.  Once the peas almost reached the desired consistency add turmeric, basil, pepper, cardamom, salt, and boiled plantain.  Finish cooking and serve warm.

P1010012

Onion, Tomato, Garlic, and Ginger with Split Peas

P1010013

Peas Just Added

P1010029

Finished

~

Injera (bread)

The bread comes in large thin pancakes and is served rolled up and sliced into 4 pieces.  Ethiopian food is served platter style so one piece of injera is used to serve the food on.  Unroll the bread and rip of small pieces to pick up the food.

P1010035

Injera

~

Serving

For contrasting flavors I served the potatoes and beets cold, the collards at room temperature, and the peas warm.  Everything was incredible but the collards were my favorite.

P1010032

Ethiopian Feast

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *